Receive a pension for NFL players

Has an NFL player / professional athlete been financially secure?

  • Registered: October 26, 2016

    So what? For one thing, many NFL players are not necessarily the most intelligent and their college degrees are mostly below average from an academic point of view. Also, in the example they are 3 years out of the field and even if they wanted to work they would have a lot of fresh college graduates and people with a few years of work experience compete. Why should I hire someone like that when I have enough choice?

    A college / university degree primarily only shows that you have the skills to think and work at a high level. In America in particular, you practically always learn on the job. Hiring an NFL player can make sense because, depending on how long he has made it in the NFL, he will definitely have the necessary work ethic.

    What is forgotten in the general discussion about the salary: Often the boys do not get this sum all at once and the living conditions cannot be compared with those of a "normal person". Most of the time they come from poor backgrounds, bring their relatives out of the "bad" neighborhoods, and sometimes support them to a not inconsiderable extent. The standard of living as such is also higher; many could not afford anything before.

  • Registered: January 16, 2018

    Last Saturday there was a fade-in at the NCAA game on pro Sieben Maxx

    Of about 1,000,000 registered players, about 1,000 make it into the NFl and there only a handful of players where the multi-million deals get

    If you invest your money correctly during your career then you can already worry about it in your late 40s / early 50s

  • Registered: December 17, 2016

    The NFLPA has already moved a lot in that direction. For example, athletes have the right to have certain medications associated with sports injuries or their long-term damage paid for by the NFL. Artificial joints are also paid for by the NFL. Neurological damage anyway.

    There is also a retirement plan that is paid for by the NFL.

    Basically, it is the NFLPA's duty to do much more because that is what the lower paid athletes need. A perspective to live as well and as healthily as possible later.

    https: //firstquarterfinance.co…ion-plan-retirement-plan/

    A nice overview of the NFL's retirement plan.

  • Registered: May 18, 2003

    The key question is: How much money is enough?

    I am personally very interested in the Early Retirement Extreme (ERE) movement (typically referred to as "frugalists" in Germany). In the circles there, one typically calculates with a net return after inflation and taxes of 4% and considers a freely investable capital of 400,000 - 600,000 € to be sufficient to be "financially independent" (= to live exclusively on the investment income). € 300,000 capital corresponds to € 12,000 per year or € 1,000 per month. Assuming expenses of € 2,500 per month, you would estimate € 750,000 accordingly. If you are ready to gradually eat the substance for breakfast, you need a little less.

    A simple arithmetic game in this context: Those who only spend 30% of their net salary and save 70% need just 9 years (based on the above assumptions) to be financially independent. For example, anyone who earns 0.4 million net a year and spends 30,000 will have done it after around two years.

    All of this is of course "sewn on edge". Nobody knows exactly what returns will be achievable in the future. Nobody knows future inflation rates. Taxes are different in every state and can change. But if you don't have a luxurious lifestyle and invest your money wisely, in my opinion you need a lot less than 3 million. Perhaps at some point in your further life you will earn another € 3.47 in another way.

    In practice I see other problems: No financial discipline, expensive advisors, expensive relatives / "friends", no sensible investment, "hedonistic treadmill" etc. Just think of Boris Becker, who probably made some bad investments. I also heard or read somewhere that he had got used to a lifestyle with expenses of € 20,000 per month.

  • Registered: October 1, 2008

    To be able to spend only 30% of the net salary is just not feasible for everyone, but that fails more because of the salary than because of the will to take back yourself.

  • Registered: October 22, 2003

    A solid post like AB has definitely taken care of it. The Steelers transferred him about 70 million. . It might be easy to do without the remaining 30 million from Oakland or elsewhere.

  • Registered: April 2, 2011

    A solid post like AB has definitely taken care of it. The Steelers transferred him about 70 million. . It might be easy to do without the remaining 30 million from Oakland or elsewhere.

    I think Tyson once had his times when he "definitely took care" But nothing can be seen of the times today.

    Of the 70 million, the taxes go again (although you mustn't forget the sponsorship income, of course. Unfortunately, I don't know what taxes the Americans pay). Of course, AB can have a good adviser, but from the outside, I see AB as someone who, in the end, will no longer have a big bank account.
    Personally, I would be more likely to get by with 3-4 million than with 60-70 million.

  • Registered: October 1, 2009

    Theoretically, the earnings of an average NFL career could be enough, but in reality it looks different. I think there are some factors that make it difficult. For one thing, pretty young people suddenly start getting a lot of money. It is not easy to always act rationally and plan for the long term. Despite all the coaching that many teams give young players in this field.
    You suddenly find yourself in a team with 52 other players and some of them earn tens of millions of dollars a year. Of course you get what lifestyle they can afford. You can't keep up with that, but you can treat yourself to something. Since many players live far away from their actual home, one can assume that the cost of living and travel are above a normal citizen.
    Only those who have signed another contract after their rookie contract have really made it.

    #Social distancing - 2m can save lives!

  • Registered: October 1, 2008

    My God, they are still grown-up people who, because of their athletic prerequisites, get opportunities in life that others can only dream of.

  • Registered on September 10, 2006

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    Years ago there was also a very good 30 for 30 from ESPN, I think that was even the first episode, it was just called "Broke"

    GNP1.de - the German-speaking number 1 for MMA, K-1 and Co.

    Beverly Hills 90210, Cleveland Browns 3

  • Registered: October 1, 2009


    ... does he also play football?

    ... Nevertheless, they are grown-up people who, due to their athletic prerequisites, get opportunities in life that others can only dream of.


    If you relate to law and order with adults, that may be true. When it comes to mature, experienced personalities, I express my doubts.
    Of course the opportunity these guys are getting is fantastic and I would have taken it, but the reality is not all rosy. Doesn't mean that every second person is sitting around at home as a care case after three years of football, but only that many have lived their dream for three years and then have to pursue a "normal job" for their rolls.

    #Social distancing - 2m can save lives!

  • Registered: October 1, 2008

    ... does he also play football?

    Yes, that may all be true, or I agree with you, that is certainly not as easy a situation as it looks from the outside and that are certainly the reasons why many probably cannot live from it after their careers, etc. .

    But when it comes down to the question of whether you have taken care of things, it becomes quite difficult to include these individual things. If one speaks of being cared for, then one cannot say: "How can he be cared for, he sees the Rolex from his quarterback and then feels compelled to want one too?" Or: "He made money very young, he can't handle it yet, so he needs even more money to really have taken care of things."

  • Registered: February 28, 2018

    The first question is what is meant by professional.
    Someone who was drafted in round 6, then played as a supplementary player for 2-3 years and then left the league, certainly didn't care.
    But with an appropriate financial plan from the start, you could at least have created reserves for your own business or property.
    As a professional athlete, of course, despite his short career, he'll get away with it.

    Normally, however, a total income of 2-3 million should be enough to be able to lead a relaxed life afterwards.
    But on a relatively normal Karl Arsch level.
    Of course, if you want to party like Gronkowski and the bottle of champagne for 30,000 is the standard, your wallet will soon be tight.
    And if you then develop a fetish for watches like Beckham, the end comes even faster. Especially when you lose the part in the champagne drink.

    But I can see a fundamental difference to people who have simply won or inherited a large sum:
    I think this is where you assess your own life and the future better. This means that you usually worry more about the time later
    because you know that such a rain of money will probably not come again.

    It's different with a sports professional:
    Even if you earn relatively little at first (500,000 or so), you somehow think that it will go on and on for the next 10 years
    that with an increasing tendency.
    That’s why one doesn’t necessarily operate in a particularly sustainable way.
    But if your knee is suddenly smashed or your performance is simply no longer right, you quickly find yourself on the street and if things go bad even with debts.
    Another problem is certainly the social environment.
    Esume, for example, often said: When in doubt, 15-20 people are attached to one person and everyone wants something from the cake.
    If you don't show a certain backbone there, you will probably be fleeced quite well on this way.
    (In the case of inheritance or profit, this is not necessarily the case, because you don't have to carry anything outside here)

    In short: if I received 2-3 million, I could easily get by with it for the rest of my life. (and probably something would still be stuck for posterity)

  • Registered: May 18, 2003

    To be able to spend only 30% of the net salary is just not feasible for everyone, but that fails more because of the salary than because of the will to take back yourself.

    Of course, this is only possible for the average citizen with a lifestyle that is specifically geared towards this, and for most of them (at least for us in a system with basic social security) it is also not very desirable. There are, however, normal earners who proceed in this way, namely the hardcore representatives among the frugalists. In any case, the calculation example shows how much can be achieved with a high savings rate. In my opinion, this is not necessarily to be grasped intuitively.

    For an NFL player, on the other hand, it should be possible in principle without any problems to live for less than 10% of the net salary. Whether or not he will do that is another matter.

  • Registered: April 23, 2016

    Of course, this is only possible for the average citizen with a lifestyle that is specifically geared towards this, and for most of them (at least for us in a system with basic social security) it is also not very desirable. There are, however, normal earners who proceed in this way, namely the hardcore representatives among the frugalists. In any case, the calculation example shows how much can be achieved with a high savings rate. In my opinion, this is not necessarily to be grasped intuitively.

    Well, if you live in a cheap flat share somewhere and otherwise live at Hartz IV level, you need a net income of ~ 2000 € to get the 70% savings rate. Not everyone has that either.

    Certainly a lot is mathematically possible, but the dream of being an NFL player also includes all the money that you can earn in the NFL. Very few players will adopt a frugalist-style reduced lifestyle in order to have taken care of them later.

  • Registered: October 22, 2003

    When I see Kasim Edebali, he's been in the NFL for 8 years and more or less played there. Since this year he has been without a contract. According to spotrac https://www.spotrac.com/nfl/ph…bali-15024/cash-earnings/ he should have earned around 3.4 million.
    It sounds like a lot of money. But I still can't imagine that this gross salary would be enough to spend the rest of the time at the pool. I think he'd have to keep working, maybe as a college coach or follow Esume's path.

  • Registered: May 15, 2003

    What does being cared for for the future actually mean?

    For me that means that there is so much money that you can get by with it until the end of your life and you don't have to rely on making money without having to make major restrictions in your lifestyle. The second part of the sentence in particular is the decisive one for me.
    If you look at it from the perspective of the average wage earner, who has his 2-4,000 € net available every month, 100,000 a year is quite a lot of money for someone who is used to spending his vacation in some exquisite hotels and 3 times a week for a few hundred euros or to go out to eat and be able to afford what he likes right now, 100,000 a year is relatively little.

    As income rises, so does expenses, a perfectly normal process. After all, one lives in the here and now and not in 40 years and is also surrounded by people who also have very high incomes and of course also spend a lot of money.